CES 2013: Samsung's Stephen Woo live blog

Samsung president Dr. Stephen Woo talks at the annual Consumer Electronics Show.

  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:12:42 PM
    With the tagline "mobilizing possibility." The company's component biz is all about taking ideas and making them real, he says.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:12:55 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:13:27 PM
    So we've got three areas of focus for the talk. Advances in processing, new memory solutions are speeding up response times, and display technology with new form factors. Also: "new ideas and new focus on mobilizing possibility for all the world's people."
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:13:37 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:13:43 PM
    So in short: big promises here on the future.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:14:04 PM
    Woo says there are more than 6 billion mobile devices in use, and more than half a billion smartphones sold.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:14:21 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:14:35 PM
    As people become more attached to these devices, they want more things Woo says. Things like weight, size, speed and form factor. Manufacturers now know they need to do all these things.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:15:19 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:15:22 PM
    Mobile's at the heart of all this, Woo says. Today's devices are all about ease of use and experience, with images of the latest Galaxy Note and Galaxy S3 up.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:15:44 PM
    Bit of an odd moment here, with one attendee yelling out "yeah, components!" following a remark by Woo about components being at the heart of it. Many laughs.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:15:50 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:15:57 PM
    Now we've got some dancers coming out on stage to dance for us. Why this is happening I have no idea.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:16:06 PM
    This keynote just got weird.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:16:45 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:16:47 PM
    With that said, the dancing is quite good. I'm not sure this is making me think of components. And now they're leaving the stage to applause.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:17:29 PM
    Woo back up now bringing us back to components. "Components are building blocks," he says. "We at Samsung component solutions are creating new game-changing components across all aspects of devices."
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:17:38 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:18:21 PM
    Woo moves on to processors. Last years they had the Exynos processor, which was the first quad-core chip.
  • Marguerite Reardon 1/9/2013 5:18:37 PM
    So I guess we are not going to see any new phones? I guess we will have to wait and see.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:18:47 PM
    (for the company that is.) This brought PC-like performance, Woo says, letting people do several tasks at once without losing speed.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:18:48 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:19:29 PM
    In less than a year, the Exynos have been sold in 53M devices. Last year the company did its Exynos5 dual processor, which is what's inside the Nexus 10 and Chromebook devices.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:19:46 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:20:48 PM
    This processor needed to support WXGA, Woo says, which was the only one to support that level of display. This made e-books and HD video run better, he adds. But the company needs to increase power while reducing power consumption, which leads us to something new.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:20:48 PM
    New: Exynos5 Octa processor.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:20:52 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:21:10 PM
    This is a whole new processor, Woo says. Has 2 sets of four cores each. This can run intense apps, but can conserve energy on "basic" tasks.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:21:39 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:21:52 PM
    Now we're getting a demo of what this can do. Woo points to a reference design tablet with the new chip built-in.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:22:28 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:22:41 PM
    On screen is a Web search for a place to eat dinner. The tablet is pulling up things like Urbanspoon, Google Maps, the browser all without disruption, Woo promises.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:22:47 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:23:20 PM
    Woo promising no dropped frames or stutters in HD movie playback. This chip is designed for high-end smartphones and tablets. This can handle all that searching and HD movie playback, for instance.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:23:43 PM
    The short version of this: it's all about multitasking on these devices without destroying your battery.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:23:45 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:24:07 PM
    Now we're getting a demo of the 3D from Glenn Roland, the VP and head of mobile platform for Electronic Arts.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:24:15 PM
    Let the games begin...
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:24:48 PM
    Roland says this chip is about more than the speed of the processor, it's about the multitasking and 3D capabilities. EA's firing up a demo which just crashed.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:25:13 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:25:20 PM
    EA's Need for Speed Most Wanted. This game is processor heavy, Roland notes. Loading up on reference design hardware.
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:25:36 PM
    And yep, it's taking a while to load up the level. Man these live demos can be brutal.
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:25:49 PM
  • James Martin 1/9/2013 5:26:18 PM
  • Josh Lowensohn 1/9/2013 5:26:42 PM
    And it finally started. Very gorgeous looking game here, lots of reflections, pretty smooth framerate. Roland notes that the collaboration between the two companies ended up with better collision effects, framerate, and particle effects.
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